Ireland (Part 2)

On August 29, 2018, we flew from Nice to Dublin for a ten-day stay on the Emerald Isle. We first spent some time in the Dublin area, then visited Galway, Dingle, and Cashel before returning to Dublin.
This is the second of three pages documenting this trip. Also ake a look at page 1 and page 3.

Galway

On September 1, 2018, we drove from Dublin to Galway, and after having checked into our hotel, we walked the short distance into the center, began exploring the place, and listened to the many street musicians who play mostly Irish folk music. Galway is a vibrant university town with a young population, and though we had only one afternoon to roam its streets, we very much enjoyed our stay there.

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Galway and the River Corrib

Galway and the River Corrib


Walking down Williams Street Street musician

Walking down Williams Street

Street musician


On Eglinton Street Claddagh jewelry shop on High Street "The Sheep" on Mainguard Street

On Eglinton Street

Claddagh jewelry shop on High Street

"The Sheep" on Mainguard Street


Strolling down High Street Freeney's Bar on High Street

Strolling down High Street

Freeney's Bar on High Street


Looking across to Claddagh Quay: the tide is out On the riverfront

Looking across to Claddagh Quay: the tide is out

On the riverfront


Capán Tae Tea House Espresso 44 Coffee Shop The Spanish Arch

Capán Tae Tea House

Espresso 44 Coffee Shop

The Spanish Arch


View from The Long Walk to Nimmo's Pier On The Long Walk

View from The Long Walk to Nimmo's Pier

On The Long Walk


Heading back through the Spanish Arch The waterfront and the Wolfe Tone Bridge

Heading back through the Spanish Arch

The waterfront and the Wolfe Tone Bridge


"The Quays" on Quay Street where I enjoyed my first Galway Hooker Strolling up Quay Street

"The Quays" on Quay Street where I enjoyed my first Galway Hooker

Strolling up Quay Street

Inisheer

The following morning at 8:15, our tour bus picked us up at our hotel and took us along the Wild Atlantic Way to the little village of Doolin. From there, we boarded a ferry to Inisheer, the smallest of the Aran Islands.


Trá Inis Oirr (Inisheer Green Coast Beach)

Trá Inis Oirr (Inisheer Green Coast Beach)


Waiting for the Doolin to Inisheer ferry On the way to the Aran Islands

Waiting for the Doolin to Inisheer ferry

On the way to the Aran Islands


Approaching Inisheer Fishing boat

Approaching Inisheer

Fishing boat


Walking along the coast Inisheer residence

Walking along the coast

Inisheer residence


By the ocean Irish limestone rock walls don't use any mortar

By the ocean

Irish limestone rock walls don't use any mortar


Brù Radharc na Mara Hostel View from our coffee shop

Brù Radharc na Mara Hostel

View from our coffee shop


Inisheer buildings Cnoc Raithní

Inisheer buildings

Cnoc Raithní

Cnoc Raithní is a Bronze Age burial mound. It was previously covered by sand (like many things on Inisheer) but was uncovered by a major storm in 1885. While it may not be the most impressive-looking site on the Aran Islands, it is significant because it pre-dates Dún Aoghasa. The site was excavated in 1886 by D. Murphy and important artifacts were found with remains dated at 1500 BC. The site itself consists of a sandy mound 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter, revetted by a drystone wall.


Misty landscape Road in the drizzle "Figures in a Landscape"

Misty landscape

Road in the drizzle

"Figures in a Landscape"


Inisheer taxi Back at the tiny harbor

Inisheer taxi

Back at the tiny harbor


Heading out to sea One last look at Inisheer

Heading out to sea

One last look at Inisheer

Cliffs of Moher

We had two hours to explore Inisheer on our own before the ferry took us first the foot of the Cliffs of Moher and then back to Doolin. There, we boarded our tour bus again and were driven to the top of the cliffs for a very different perspective. By 7:30 in the evening, we were back at our hotel in Galway. A long but wonderful day and a fantastic excursion!


Approaching the Cliffs of Moher

Approaching the Cliffs of Moher


O'Brien's Tower seen from the bottom of the cliffs At the bottom of the cliffs

O'Brien's Tower seen from the bottom of the cliffs

At the bottom of the cliffs


At their highest point, the cliffs rise up 214 meters (702 feet) The Branaunmore Sea Stack

At their highest point, the cliffs rise up 214 meters (702 feet)

The Branaunmore Sea Stack


The view from the top of the cliffs The cliffs extend over a length of 14 kilometers (8.6 miles)

The view from the top of the cliffs

The cliffs extend over a length of 14 kilometers (8.6 miles)


Looking in the opposite direction towards the beach of Lahinch O'Brien's Tower

Looking in the opposite direction towards the beach of Lahinch

O'Brien's Tower


Fog can move in or out in a matter of seconds On the cliff walk

Fog can move in or out in a matter of seconds

On the cliff walk


On top of the cliffs Going beyond the fence is definitely not recommended!

On top of the cliffs

Going beyond the fence is definitely not recommended!


The photos on this page were taken on September 1 and 2, 2018.
This is the second of three pages documenting this trip. Also take a look at page 1 and page 3.

The photos of all three Ireland pages along with many others may also be viewed as a gallery or a slide show. Check it out!




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